Cigar News: Ohana Cigars expanding with Left Hand Cigar Company at IPCPR 2018

July 2, 2018--Press Release: Left Hand Cigar Co is going to be the newest addition to the Familia Rodriguez Tobacos LLC, which is also the parent company of Ohana Cigars.

Left Hand Cigar Co. cigars will be produced under the supervision of Noel Rojas in Nicaragua, at a new undisclosed Factory where Ohana, as well as Noel’s personal projects are being manufactured. We are also excited to announce that in the near future, most of Ohana and Left Hand Cigar Co. limited release cigars will be made in a domestic Factory in Dallas,Texas operated by Noel Rojas, and rolled by mostly Cuban refugees that come from many years of experience from various big name Cuban factories like Partagas, La Corona, El Laguito etc. LHC will be releasing its first 2 lines in time for IPCPR.

The first blend coming out of the new Nicaraguan factory is called “Blurred Lines” and is comprised of  all Nicaraguan fillers, Condega, Jalapa as well as a small amount of Ometepe, with two wrappers in barber pole style, a Nicaraguan Habano and a Habano Maduro, these will have a closed foot.(something we enjoy and customers know us for)

The second cigar is something that we have been working on since teaming up with Noel Rojas, a Connecticut broadleaf “Pulse”. The “Pulse” is the core line of Ohana, having already a Equadorian wrapper on one, and a genuine San Andres on the maduro, we are introducing this as an LHC cigar, since it will be box pressed and closed foot just like the San Andres “Pulse”, so rather than confuse our consumers,(as well as we just think this is really different) it will have the same band as the rest of Left Hand has, as well as a new name. If you are a retailer please email us at ohanacigarorders@gmail.com

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